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Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Search Phrase of the Day

 I’m doing this frequently these days, but I just can’t pass up these opportunities. These search phrases indicate to me what people want to know.

Today’s phrase of note that brought someone to my blog is…
"talking to gp about consensual incest"
In this case, “gp” is probably “General Practitioner” or “General Physician” or maybe even “Gynecological Physician” (although those are usually referred to as OB/GYN.)

While it can be an especially intense experience emotionally and physically, from a purely mechanical sense consanguineous sex (or consensual incest or consanguinamory) is no different from any other sex. Since that is the case, there is no reason to tell a doctor that you are having consensual sex with a close relative or family member, only that you are sexually active.

If, however, you are pregnant or considering a pregnancy with a close relative, that can be a different matter. In general, anyone concerned about genetic diseases or disabilities should consult with medical and other scientific professionals who specialize in those matters. Since a close genetic relative carries more of the same genetic material you do, and since anyone who has lived in the same location as you has shares the same environment as you (including pollution, communicable diseases, etc.), any problem that can be passed on to children might be of more concern if it can be passed along by both parents instead of just one.

I’m not a medical professional nor an attorney. Laws about medical privacy and mandatory reporting of criminal activity to law enforcement vary from place to place, so really, this is an issue to bring up (perhaps as a “hypothetical” wink wink) with an attorney who specializes in criminal and/or medical law and is familiar with the laws and legal system in your jurisdiction. Perhaps there is a certain way you can broach the subject with a doctor that will keep you out of legal trouble?

Laws or not, doctors have their own temperaments, personalities, priorities, biases, prejudices, etc. If they’ve been in practice for years, they’ve seen it all and I guarantee you they have had other patients with active consanguinamorous sex lives, pregnancies conceived between close relatives, and that the doctor has often been aware of the reality of the situation. Some doctors may be reassuring and supportive, some may be hostile. Some will simply approach the matter as another professional task.

As always, I welcome comments from anyone with any experience in these topics, whether as patients, law enforcement, legal advisors, or medical professionals.




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2 comments:

  1. I read gp as "grandparent"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That could be a much more exciting conversation. ;-)

      Delete

To prevent spam, comments will have to be approved, so your comment may not appear for several hours. Feedback is welcome, including disagreement. I only delete/reject/mark as spam: spam, vulgar or hateful attacks, repeated spouting of bigotry from the same person that does not add to the discussion, and the like. I will not reject comments based on disagreement, but if you don't think consenting adults should be free to love each other, then I do not consent to have you repeatedly spout hate on my blog without adding anything to the discourse.

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IT IS OK TO TALK ABOUT SEX IN YOUR COMMENTS, BUT PLEASE CHOOSE YOUR WORDS CAREFULLY AS I WANT THIS BLOG TO BE AS "SAFE FOR WORK" AS POSSIBLE.